Dating of documents

England therefore remained 10 days behind the New Style Calendar.

dating of documents-9dating of documents-14

Ordinal numbers are represented by superscript letters following them, just as today. Top of page Money was calculated in pounds, shillings and pence. The pound was represented either by ‘li’, or £: transcribe both with a £ sign before the amount given. It was worth two-thirds of a pound, that is 13s 4d.

This symbol is actually an elaborate ‘L’, from the Latin ‘libra’, meaning pound. Half a mark (one-third of a pound) was therefore 6s 8d.

Thus the year number did not change until 25 March, so taking 1558 as an example, the dates ran as follows: So if you see a document dated any time between January and 24 March before 1752, be aware that in modern terms, you need to add a year.

In publications you may see this written as January 1750/51, the year as it was known at the time / the year as we know it now.

For further information about measurement see Colin Chapman, ‘How heavy, how much and how long?

: weights, money and other measures used by our ancestors’ (Lochin,1995).

So in 1752 these days had to be cut out of the year to make the adjustment.

Therefore Wednesday 2 September 1752 was followed immediately by Thursday 14 September.

40 perches = 1 rood 4 roods = 1 acre Confusion arises from the fact that a perch is also a measurement of length.

A perch, pole and rod are all terms for a measurement of length of approximately 5 metres (5.5 yards).

So documents written in the first year that Charles II was on the throne would actually be styled 12 Charles II. Jones (eds), ‘A Handbook of Dates: For Students of British History’ (Cambridge University Press, revd 2000).

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