Mormon dating non mormon

Though you'll rarely hear about it from a pulpit, Mormon leaders are concerned with the continuity of their religion.

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In the face of declining millennial religiosity, Mutual, which is named after an old church program that brought Mormon youth together, may have another benefit: ensuring the longevity of Mormonism.

One swipe at a time, Mutual is uniting the Mormon diaspora, perpetuating lineages, and addressing the anxieties of youth facing familial and cultural pressure, as well as a personal desire, to marry within their faith.

When she enrolled in Brigham Young University, Mormonism's flagship school, Sewell expected to get married right away.

Upon returning from her Mormon mission in New Hampshire, Sewell felt unable to break into the "competitive" dating pool at BYU, where appearance is paramount.

After a semester, Sewell returned home to Arizona, where she prayed for help finding a husband.

Mormons today face longer tenures in singledom and a skewed gender ratio.

One user, Brandon, who is 28, captures the ethos of the app in his "About Me": "(I) would like to be married and raise children." Another, Kolton, 21, of Rexburg, Idaho goes even further, telling prospective matches, "If you're on here just for fun, unmatch me!

" Cooper Boice, the founder of Mutual, says that while some people are just on the app to date, he considers marriage to be the "ultimate success." In total, he says, more than 100,000 Mormons in more than 100 countries around the world have swiped through the app more than 250 million times.

Curious eyes wander the pews, scoping out the well-groomed singles while hymns are sung and the sacrament is passed.

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