Statistics about violence in teen dating relationships

The abuse Segovia experienced at the hands of her 17-year-old boyfriend followed a trajectory that adult survivors will find familiar: it started off with verbal abuse. You look like a slut.’ And then it escalated from there,” she said.

A common misconception about teen dating violence is that survivors don’t experience the same level of abuse as adult women.

“A lot of the time people think that we’re young, and so it [the domestic violence] can’t be that bad,” she said.

Studies have shown children who grow up in homes where abuse occurs are more likely to be violent with their intimate partners as adults.

By: JM Oran A tender smile crosses Kimberly Segovia’s face when she checks her smartphone and notices a text message from her fiancé.

One problem the task force hopes to tackle is the spotty coordination and communication among the police, prosecutors, city housing officials and organizations that provide services to victims.

Those organizations say the information one agency has too often remains cut off from other agencies that need it.

It can be a red flag when a sociable teenager with many friends and interests suddenly starts distancing themselves from friends and family to spend time with a boyfriend/girlfriend.

A sudden change in personality or behavior Teenagers are notorious for sullen or moody behavior, but they might be acting out for a more serious reason.

Teenagers will often be too scared or embarrassed to tell the truth so adults need to probe a little deeper if they are concerned by a child’s behavior or appearance.

RECOGNIZING SIGNS OF POSSIBLE TEEN DATING VIOLENCE Unexplained bruises Segovia played volleyball in school, and dismissed the bruises that often appeared on her face and body as sport injuries.

She was only 13 when she met the man who would terrorize her for the next four years, and become the father of her first child.

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